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of the uc system. >>> also a major expansion to tell you about. how much facebook plans to spend to carve out more space on the peninsula. >> and would you believe a flu vaccine made from insects. the new hope for people suffering from the flu virus. >>> and good evening. i'm jeff ranieri. hazy sunshine for today, but by all accounts really gorgeous outside. 74 in the scotts valley. 67 in the mill valley who could hit 70 degrees tomorrow coming up. ♪ secondhand smoke affects everyone's health. it's not just irritating. it can cause heart disease and even death. speak up about secondhand smoke. your health and the health of your family depend on it. >>> researchers are using bugs to battle the flu bug and people with allergies may be the big winners. a cdc map charting flu activity shows the virus is widespread in all but three states. doctors are urging everyone who hasn't gotten the vaccine yet to get one as soon as possible. nbc bay area's marianne favro is live at the santa clara health department with a closer look at a new egg-free flu vaccine. marianne? >> reporter: janelle it is
. the university spent more than $4 million marketing new online courses. the plan was to offer uc quality courses online to anyone including those not enrolled at the school. classes cost between $1,400 and $2,200. only one non-uc student signed up for an online class in the past year. another major problem, others like stanford and harvard offer many for free. >>> you are watching one right now. of course talking about the it tv set. >> the hottest ticket at the consumer electronics show in las vegas and our business and tech reporter scott budman to peer into the future. do you get to sample all of the these? is it for sale or just display? >> reporter: these are all samples. they're not for sale yet. sort of what you will be able to buy and that goes for a lot you're about to see. the future is bright and the future is very thin if you're a television set. they're still big draws and they're getting better. when it comes to television, we still like things big. the big screen, high resolution, you know, to impress our friends who come over to watch sports or strange reality shows. but after th
budget include language preventing the uc and csu systems from raising tuition for at least seven years. >> so as we noted perhaps the bigger winner in all of this new budget may be the public schools. but there's a catch. not every school is getting an equal slice of the pie. the governor even pointed to bay area communities to illustrate why he's doing this. let's bring in nbc's arturo santiago who joins us in piedmont. one of the areas governor brown mentioned you're there. one of the areas governor brown mentioned by name today, correct? >> that's correct. when talking about new funding formula for k through 12 schools, the governor mentioned a number of high and low income areas. specifically richmond and piedmont were mentioned. we talked to administrators in both districts. >> at perry's elementary school in the west contra costa unified school district, 100% of the students are on the free or reduce lunch program, the kind of school governor brown is focusing on with his changes in proposed funding. >> growing up in compton or richmond is not like it is to grow up in los gatos o
their online failure. only one nonstudent enrolled after the uc system spent more than $4 million to market an online program to students and nonstudents. by contrast, csu model is built for an existing audience of students looking for matt and statistic courses they must have to graduate and the price just $150 a course. >> if you try to staff those classes and we have a strong human element to help even the weakest students and the students that need extra attention. >> reporter: at this staffing agency where they know how much employers value education, the idea of making graduation more assessable is good news. >> as long as you can always make sure it's that individual that's getting their degree and doing the work is also important, i think it's a wonderful tool and wonderful resource. >> reporter: garcia wishes she could have gone online years ago. >> it make a lot of students' lives easier by doing that. >> reporter: this is just a pilot program of 100 students but the university spokeswoman says that it also represents the president of the university's vision that early course work
will be rerouted. >>> in san francisco today some tough love from governor brown as he addressed the uc board of regents. >> let's get real. i propose 5% more. you're proposing 11.6%. how do you make up the gap? the governor applauded them for leading the way down a more uphill road as part of the austerity, the regents today called for an expansion of online courses. >> we have new information regarding that burglary at the oakland museum of california last week. the museum release this had picture of what was stolen. a jewelry box made some time in the 1870s by goldsmith a. a andre andrews. the box features engravings and moldings valued at $800,000. the museum is offering a $12,000 reward for the safe return of that box. again, someone stole it last monday. >> okay. if you're looking for a job, we know where you should start. how about the best places in the country to work because those were chosen today. >> our business and tech reporter scott budman has the lowdown. scott, lots of bay area companies making the list. >> you're right. bay area tech companies doing very well in the annual
a professor of mechanical engineering at uc davis. >> not all of them are safe. absolutely. >> reporter: hubbard says the key to preventing serious accidents is counterweighting the distance from the jump to the landing. >> accommodate for any place you want to land and it makes it so you land equally everywhere. >> reporter: while ski resorts keep accident sta ttistics prive a study presented at a conference organized by the international society for skiing safety found the rate of spine and head injuries at terrain parks is double that compared to other areas at a resort. >> i had no idea that these jumps really have almost little to no design. >> reporter: when kenny hit a jump at more than 35 miles an hour at a terrain park at the summit at snoqualmie in washington, it sent him more than three stories up in the air. >> the landing of the ramp was way too short. it dropped me on the flat ice instead of dropping me down to more of a sloped landing which in theory would have prevented the injury that i got. >> reporter: paralyzed from the neck down at 23 years old, he received more tha
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6

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